What is Crossfit?

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CrossFit begins with a belief in fitness.  After looking at all sport and physical tasks collectively, we asked what physical skills and adaptations would most universally lend themselves to performance advantage. Capacity culled from the intersection of all sports demands would quite logically lend itself well to all sport. In sum, our specialty is not specializing.

The aim of CrossFit is to forge a broad, general and inclusive fitness. We have sought to build a program that will best prepare trainees for any physical contingency — not only for the unknown, but for the unknowable.


Primarily, it’s a fitness regimen developed by Coach Greg Glassman over several decades.

He was the first person in history to define fitness in a meaningful, measurable way (increased work capacity across broad time and modal domains). CrossFit itself is defined as that which optimizes fitness (constantly varied functional movements performed at relatively high intensity).

CrossFit is also the community that spontaneously arises when people do these workouts together. In fact, the communal aspect of CrossFit is a key component of why it’s so effective.


Today, CrossFit, the company, provides accredited training seminars throughout the world.

They publish several websites providing extensive free content, including workouts, training and support for becoming fit, as well as a growing Journal of extended instruction.

CrossFit has a worldwide network of more than 5,500 affiliated gyms and more than 35,000 accredited CrossFit Level 1 trainers. And, we have created the Sport of Fitness, known as the CrossFit Games, where we crown the Fittest Man and Woman on Earth.


Anyone with an Internet connection and the willingness, curiosity, and bravery to try it, could.

From a simple blog and a single gym in Santa Cruz, Calif., there sprung an immense community of fitness enthusiasts who have learned the movements, tested the theory and accumulated a huge amount of data supporting Glassman’s equation:

CVFM @ HI + Communal Environment = Health

A regimen of constantly varied, functional movements (CVFM) performed at high intensity (HI) in a communal environment leads to health and fitness.”

Greg Glassman

This information is from the CrossFit Headquarters in southern California – Click here to read more

Thats all great, but is CrossFit for me?

CrossFit Defined

  • CrossFit Whiteboard - Constantly Varied
  • CrossFit Whiteboard: Functional Movement
  • CrossFit Whiteboard: Intensity

Anyone Can Do CrossFit

The videos below are just a few examples of all the different walks of life enjoying the benefits of CrossFit
  • Better Than Ever: Laurie Hansen
    "I think my favorite part is the community. I love the people here ... everybody is rooting for you and they want you to do your best." Meet Laurie Hansen–a 60-year-old athlete at CrossFit Kinnick in Upland, California. Hansen continues, "A lot of my friends are on medication ... they're starting to whine, and I feel strong."
  • Daniel Casey’s Story, “… And Fitness For Life"
    Last January, Daniel Casey became a CrossFit sensation. At a bodyweight of around 400 lb.—down from around 550 lb. after a year of CrossFit—he competed in the inaugural scaled option of the 2015 Reebok CrossFit Games Open, completing each of the five workouts for a 5,202nd-place finish in the Central East Region. His story inspired thousands across social media, many of whom contacted Casey and credited him with motivating them to join their local CrossFit affiliates.
  • Freda Burnette: I Want to Live Longer
    "I want to be able to always get up and do things." Freda Burnette is a 65-year-old grandmother of 11. She trains at CrossFit Grace in Boiling Springs, South Carolina. "I'm here working out because I want to live longer. I want to be able to watch my grandchildren grow up."
  • chromosonally enhanced
    "I think that if you're afraid to have that relationship, you're missing out on something ... When you break down that barrier the rewards are great to you ... because you learn about the human spirit." Mitch Holeve coaches a group of kids with Down syndrome at CrossFit Showdown in Davie, Florida, including his son Garrett.
  • Unstoppable: Cassidy Duffield
    “If you would’ve told me 10 months ago that I was going to compete in weightlifting in a national championship, I would’ve laughed and called you a liar because I just never thought that I could do something like that,” says Cassidy Duffield of Salt Lake City CrossFit. A former gymnast, she was once self-conscious about having broad shoulders and a muscular figure
  • 73-Year-Old on the CrossFit Games Open: “I'm Doing It This Year!”
    Nancy Hoshaw survived a heart attack at 48 and breast cancer at 60. At 73, she’s entering the CrossFit Games Open, which kicked off Feb. 25. While some compete to be named Fittest on Earth, Hoshaw is competing with time and age—and she’s winning.
  • I Just Wanted to Breathe
    At Kshanti CrossFit in Virginia, Andrea West is best known as “Babs”—Badass Bitch. She’s a hard-working athlete who has a rare disease called alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, which raises risks for lung and liver diseases. After she finishes the workout, she cheers on fellow athletes, then she might reach for her inhaler. Once a week, she administers intravenous infusions on herself.
  • Garrett “G-Money” Holeve: From the Box to the Cage
    Garrett “G-money” Holeve is an enthusiastic MMA fighter, an avid CrossFitter and a hardworking employee at Home Depot. At CrossFit Showdown in Davie, Florida, Holeve attends classes that are dedicated to adaptive athletes with Down syndrome.
  • Jacinto Bonilla, a 73-Year-Old CrossFitter
    Meet Jacinto Bonilla, a 73-Year-Old CrossFitter, prostate cancer survivor, and overall inspirational athlete. Find out how Jacinto first discovered CrossFit six years ago at CrossFit Virtuosity in Brooklyn, and the impact that it has had on his life.